LANGUAGE ARTS

LANGUAGE ARTS

WHY

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Study the resources below to understand why language arts are important, what should be taught, and how to teach. 

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A child's brain is built on words. A strong foundation in language arts (and other subjects) depends on the quality and quantity of words heard in the first few years of life.
Narration is the act of telling back what you know. It is the most effective way to turn information into knowledge. Children narrate as a replacement for quizzes and worksheets.
Recitation is the act of reading aloud poetry, passages, or speeches many times and then reciting it to others. This requires the child to ponder over the author's purpose and emotion behind the poem or passage and reflect that in their own recitation. Memorization is not the purpose, but is usually a by-product.
Reading lessons start whenever the child shows interest, as early as 3 years old. Lessons before age 6 should always be child-led. A combination of phonics and whole word approach is used to develop avid readers and competent spellers.
Children copy down favorite sentences from their school books and lines from their favorite poems. This gives children opportunities to notice patterns in punctuation, grammar, and spelling. This lays the groundwork for future lessons in grammar and dictation.
The parent reads a passage clause-by-clause while the child copies it down. The child then looks at their work and the original side-by-side to check for errors. This is another "living" method of teaching punctuation and grammar.
Grammar is started in year 4 along with composition. Real books and the child's own writing are used to teach grammatical concepts. Additionally, children look at their favorite author's style to understand how grammar can be used effectively.
Once children have a good foundation of oral narration, dictation, and grammar they are ready to start composing their own writing. Composition, or written narration, is simply writing down an oral narration and advances to more structured writing prompts.

HOW TO TEACH

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Study the resources below, and don’t forget to read the Methods section on the Basic Principles page.

RESOURCES